Tag Archives for " LPM "

Handoffs Are Making Your Matters Late

Unless you’re a lone wolf, your project is going to have hand-offs.

Sorry, did I say “project?” I forgot for a moment that this is a legal blog. I meant “matter.” Or “case.” Or whatever else you call that “individual or collaborative enterprise that is carefully planned and designed to achieve a particular aim.”1  For consistency with the rest of the business world, let’s call it a project.Continue reading

Removing Bottlenecks to Productivity and Profit

Removing Bottlenecks to Productivity and Profit

I just wrote my first article for Lawyerist, Removing Bottlenecks to Productivity and Profit. In it, I discuss the single bottleneck concept behind the Theory of Constraints (check out my earlier posts here and here). I also write about the importance of measuring a few key things within your workflow (but not too many), and then using the data you glean to not only tell whether your improvement worked within the context of the thing you were trying to improve, but, more importantly, whether that local improvement succeeded in improving your practice overall.

Check out the article, and don’t hesitate to contact me if you want to learn more!

Kanban for Lawyers, Part 2: A Retrospective

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If you haven’t already, you should probably go check out my last post, which is essentially Chapter 1 of my in-progress book Kanban For Lawyers. As I write this, I’m currently wrapping up the 8th chapter and I plan to publish it to the LeanPub version of the book next week. Right now you can buy the book on LeanPub for as little as a dollar, and if you do so you’ll be entitled to Continue reading

Kanban For Lawyers: Getting Started

Recently the ABA’s Law Practice Today Magazine published my article The Dawn of the Agile Attorney. In it, I profile several lawyers, some practicing attorneys and others who have gone on to legal tech careers, who have adopted Agile methods in their work and lives.

Reception to the article has been great, and several people have asked me for resources on learning more about Agile. One the one hand, there’s no shortage of information online about Agile and its subsets like Scrum, Kanban, and Lean Startup. On the other, much of the available info is specific to the needs of software teams and developers.

I’m working on a backlog of article ideas for Agile techniques that I (and others) have specifically adapted for use by lawyers, but I want to get started by discussing the Agile methodology that I think is often the best and easiest-to-implement entry point for attorneys (and other professionals) who are new to Agile: Kanban. Continue reading

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